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Paul Kasmin Gallery

293 Tenth Ave. New York, NY 10001
515 W. 27th Street New York, NY 10001
paulkasmingallery.com

PK SHOP is moving! Our brick-and-mortar space is currently closed for the summer, and will will be reopening in a new space this fall.
We’re proud to say that we’ve collaborated with Milan’s M77 Gallery to present Santi Moix: Brooklyn Studio, on view October 21, 2014 - January 31, 2015.
Click through for more details.

Above: Santi Moix, Calm, 2014Oil on canvas, 50 x 60 inches (127 x 152.4 cm)Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery

We’re proud to say that we’ve collaborated with Milan’s M77 Gallery to present Santi Moix: Brooklyn Studioon view October 21, 2014 - January 31, 2015.

Click through for more details.

Above: Santi Moix, Calm, 2014
Oil on canvas, 50 x 60 inches (127 x 152.4 cm)
Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery

No shoes/No smoking in Ivan Navarro’s The Music Room: site-specific for the New York Art Book Fair.
The New York Observer’s Alanna Martinez and Nate Freeman discuss they’re experience over the weekend. 
Alanna: I have to mention Ivan Navarro’s music roomNate: Tell me about the music room, I was too busy looking at punk rock posters for the music room.Alanna: The floor of the room was covered in thick foam, and separated into little foam pits for sitting where people could plop down and jam out to the music they were blasting.Alanna: BUT you had to take off your shoes to get the full living room, parent’s basement vibe. No smoking, so it felt like there was a little something missing there for the full effect.
Read the full chat from the New York Observer.

No shoes/No smoking in Ivan Navarro’s The Music Room: site-specific for the New York Art Book Fair.

The New York Observer’s Alanna Martinez and Nate Freeman discuss they’re experience over the weekend. 

Alanna: I have to mention Ivan Navarro’s music room
Nate: Tell me about the music room, I was too busy looking at punk rock posters for the music room.
Alanna: The floor of the room was covered in thick foam, and separated into little foam pits for sitting where people could plop down and jam out to the music they were blasting.
Alanna: BUT you had to take off your shoes to get the full living room, parent’s basement vibe. No smoking, so it felt like there was a little something missing there for the full effect.

Read the full chat from the New York Observer.

The New York Art Book Fair opens tomorrow night at MoMA PS1 from 6-8pm!
We’re very excited to share that James Nares will be performing with Thurston Moore (of Sonic Youth) on the PS1 steps at 8pm, and Iván Navarro will present a site-specific project, The Music Room, throughout the weekend.
Hope to see you there!

Above: The two artists at the opening of Junkie’s Promises at Paul Kasmin Gallery, curated by Iván Navarro, summer 2013.

The New York Art Book Fair opens tomorrow night at MoMA PS1 from 6-8pm!

We’re very excited to share that James Nares will be performing with Thurston Moore (of Sonic Youth) on the PS1 steps at 8pm, and Iván Navarro will present a site-specific project, The Music Roomthroughout the weekend.

Hope to see you there!

Above: The two artists at the opening of Junkie’s Promises at Paul Kasmin Gallery, curated by Iván Navarro, summer 2013.

Paul Kasmin Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of new work by Elliott Puckette.Puckette’s work has been characterized by its calligraphic nature. Its linear abstraction, which is precisely etched into prepared grounds with a razor blade, it is also evocative of music and the curvature of the body.In her latest series, Puckette continues to explore the tension between control and freedom while breaking with the stylized linear form with which her work has been previously associated. These paintings are based on wire maquettes that the artist has constructed. Serving as models, the abstract bundles remove the constraint of the automatic, anticipated gesture. The resulting etched forms demonstrate a complex relationship between figure and ground, stasis and action. 
For more information, visit paulkasmingallery.com/exhibitions.

Elliott PucketteBellerophon, 2014Gesso, ink, and kaolin on board60 inches (152.5 cm) diameterCourtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery

Paul Kasmin Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of new work by Elliott Puckette.

Puckette’s work has been characterized by its calligraphic nature. Its linear abstraction, which is precisely etched into prepared grounds with a razor blade, it is also evocative of music and the curvature of the body.

In her latest series, Puckette continues to explore the tension between control and freedom while breaking with the stylized linear form with which her work has been previously associated. These paintings are based on wire maquettes that the artist has constructed. Serving as models, the abstract bundles remove the constraint of the automatic, anticipated gesture. The resulting etched forms demonstrate a complex relationship between figure and ground, stasis and action. 

For more information, visit paulkasmingallery.com/exhibitions.

Elliott Puckette
Bellerophon, 2014
Gesso, ink, and kaolin on board
60 inches (152.5 cm) diameter
Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery

We’re very excited to announce that Deborah Kass’ Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, 1994, is now on view in the Brooklyn Museum’s 4th floor Contemporary Art Galleries. 

We find Kass herself appearing repeatedly as Warhol, each time adapting some of his most famous self-representations. Among them are his self-portrait from the mid-’60s in which he partially covers his face with his fingers, and which she retitles, amusingly, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1994), and another from the mid-’80s in which, wearing a fright wig, he colored his face with a translucent camouflage design. Warhol’s portraits both conceal and reveal their subject. Kass compounded that effect, faithfully replicating her sources, even making us look twice, almost convinced that we are looking at the originals.” 
Art In America, “A Woman Under The Influence,” by Faye Hirsch, November 2012 

Deborah KassPortrait of the Artist as a Young Man, 1994Silkscreen ink and acrylic on canvas24 panels, each 22 x 22 inches (55.9 x 55.9 cm)Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

We’re very excited to announce that Deborah Kass’ Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, 1994, is now on view in the Brooklyn Museum’s 4th floor Contemporary Art Galleries. 

We find Kass herself appearing repeatedly as Warhol, each time adapting some of his most famous self-representations. Among them are his self-portrait from the mid-’60s in which he partially covers his face with his fingers, and which she retitles, amusingly, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1994), and another from the mid-’80s in which, wearing a fright wig, he colored his face with a translucent camouflage design. Warhol’s portraits both conceal and reveal their subject. Kass compounded that effect, faithfully replicating her sources, even making us look twice, almost convinced that we are looking at the originals.”

Art In America, “A Woman Under The Influence,” 
by Faye Hirsch, November 2012 

Deborah Kass
Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, 1994
Silkscreen ink and acrylic on canvas
24 panels, each 22 x 22 inches (55.9 x 55.9 cm)
Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Among the smallest works in Nir Hod’s Once Everything Was Much Better Even The Future is The Back Room (2014).

By presenting scratches upon a reflective, chromed surface emanating light, the works underline Hod’s pursuit of the sublime as a place of pleasurable fear and forbidden desire.
On view through October 25. 

Nir HodThe Back Room, 2014acrylic, oil, paint remover, chrome on canvas37 1/2 x 26 3/4 inches95.3 x 67.9 cm

Among the smallest works in Nir Hod’s Once Everything Was Much Better Even The Future is The Back Room (2014).

By presenting scratches upon a reflective, chromed surface emanating light, the works underline Hod’s pursuit of the sublime as a place of pleasurable fear and forbidden desire.

On view through October 25. 

Nir Hod
The Back Room, 2014
acrylic, oil, paint remover, chrome on canvas
37 1/2 x 26 3/4 inches
95.3 x 67.9 cm

Paul Kasmin Gallery and Art Production Fund are pleased to announce Deborah Kass’ public art project at The Street, Chestnut Hill, MA.Kass’ works will take over The Street, a high-traffic shopping and dining area, as forty large-scale reproductions from the artist’s feel good paintings for feel bad times series take the form of banners and a billboard. Among the works included are OY (2009), Sweet Thing (2008), and Forget Your Troubles (2010). Here, Kass continues to employ the visual motifs of post-war painting, while incorporating lyrics from Broadway musicals, film quotes, and Yiddish sayings to explore the intersection of art history, popular culture, and personal identity. As part of the project, Art Production Fund has organized an accompanying mobile phone audio guide with details on each work recorded by the artist. The Street has quickly become known for its convergence of high fashion, food, entertainment, and community events; from acoustic evenings with musicians from the Berklee School of Music to family oriented activities, the property embodies its developer and owner, WS Development’s, desire to push the boundaries of what a new project can mean to the community. “Deborah Kass’ work brings the important message of contemporary art to a venue that is not typically associated with public art projects of such prestige,” said Art Production Fund Co-Founders Doreen Remen and Yvonne Force Villareal. “We were inspired by the prospect of working in uncharted territory and within an unexpected forum, and hope this work engages the local community.”

Paul Kasmin Gallery and Art Production Fund are pleased to announce Deborah Kass’ public art project at The Street, Chestnut Hill, MA.

Kass’ works will take over The Street, a high-traffic shopping and dining area, as forty large-scale reproductions from the artist’s feel good paintings for feel bad times series take the form of banners and a billboard. Among the works included are OY (2009), Sweet Thing (2008), and Forget Your Troubles (2010). Here, Kass continues to employ the visual motifs of post-war painting, while incorporating lyrics from Broadway musicals, film quotes, and Yiddish sayings to explore the intersection of art history, popular culture, and personal identity. As part of the project, Art Production Fund has organized an accompanying mobile phone audio guide with details on each work recorded by the artist.

The Street has quickly become known for its convergence of high fashion, food, entertainment, and community events; from acoustic evenings with musicians from the Berklee School of Music to family oriented activities, the property embodies its developer and owner, WS Development’s, desire to push the boundaries of what a new project can mean to the community. “Deborah Kass’ work brings the important message of contemporary art to a venue that is not typically associated with public art projects of such prestige,” said Art Production Fund Co-Founders Doreen Remen and Yvonne Force Villareal. “We were inspired by the prospect of working in uncharted territory and within an unexpected forum, and hope this work engages the local community.”

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