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Paul Kasmin Gallery

293 Tenth Ave. New York, NY 10001
515 W. 27th Street New York, NY 10001
paulkasmingallery.com

PK SHOP is moving! Our brick-and-mortar space is currently closed for the summer, and will will be reopening in a new space this fall.
Paul Kasmin Gallery and Art Production Fund are pleased to announce Deborah Kass’ public art project at The Street, Chestnut Hill, MA.Kass’ works will take over The Street, a high-traffic shopping and dining area, as forty large-scale reproductions from the artist’s feel good paintings for feel bad times series take the form of banners and a billboard. Among the works included are OY (2009), Sweet Thing (2008), and Forget Your Troubles (2010). Here, Kass continues to employ the visual motifs of post-war painting, while incorporating lyrics from Broadway musicals, film quotes, and Yiddish sayings to explore the intersection of art history, popular culture, and personal identity. As part of the project, Art Production Fund has organized an accompanying mobile phone audio guide with details on each work recorded by the artist. The Street has quickly become known for its convergence of high fashion, food, entertainment, and community events; from acoustic evenings with musicians from the Berklee School of Music to family oriented activities, the property embodies its developer and owner, WS Development’s, desire to push the boundaries of what a new project can mean to the community. “Deborah Kass’ work brings the important message of contemporary art to a venue that is not typically associated with public art projects of such prestige,” said Art Production Fund Co-Founders Doreen Remen and Yvonne Force Villareal. “We were inspired by the prospect of working in uncharted territory and within an unexpected forum, and hope this work engages the local community.”

Paul Kasmin Gallery and Art Production Fund are pleased to announce Deborah Kass’ public art project at The Street, Chestnut Hill, MA.

Kass’ works will take over The Street, a high-traffic shopping and dining area, as forty large-scale reproductions from the artist’s feel good paintings for feel bad times series take the form of banners and a billboard. Among the works included are OY (2009), Sweet Thing (2008), and Forget Your Troubles (2010). Here, Kass continues to employ the visual motifs of post-war painting, while incorporating lyrics from Broadway musicals, film quotes, and Yiddish sayings to explore the intersection of art history, popular culture, and personal identity. As part of the project, Art Production Fund has organized an accompanying mobile phone audio guide with details on each work recorded by the artist.

The Street has quickly become known for its convergence of high fashion, food, entertainment, and community events; from acoustic evenings with musicians from the Berklee School of Music to family oriented activities, the property embodies its developer and owner, WS Development’s, desire to push the boundaries of what a new project can mean to the community. “Deborah Kass’ work brings the important message of contemporary art to a venue that is not typically associated with public art projects of such prestige,” said Art Production Fund Co-Founders Doreen Remen and Yvonne Force Villareal. “We were inspired by the prospect of working in uncharted territory and within an unexpected forum, and hope this work engages the local community.”

Nir Hod in W Magazine
Behind the MirrorArtist Nir Hod’s new exhibition examines the beauty in lonelinessby Kat HerrimanAfter working for 15 years out of his Meatpacking District studio, Israeli-born artist Nir Hod is as much a New Yorker as he is a transplant—and his new exhibition “Once Everything Was Much Better Even the Future” at Paul Kasmin Gallery is a collision of the paradoxical influences that have shaped his city experience. A converging swell of nightclub narcissism, dark history, salacious violence, and materialistic glamour, the work explores the perverse beauty in our ugliest desires. With not a portrait in sight, the show is a first for Hod, who is best known for his sickly humorous Genius series, which features Van-Dyke-inspired paintings of insidious toddlers.
One of the show’s most compelling elements is a triptych of flaming orchids entitled I Want Always to be Remembered in Your Heart. “I became obsessed with the challenge of painting realistic flames after looking at the surreal realism of Gerhard Richter’s work,” says Hod. “I wanted the flames to look almost like a ghost encompassing the flower.” Another notable piece is his pumpjack snowglobe, a larger-than-life sculpture in the form of the iconic souvenir, which is filled with crude oil rather than white flakes in water. “When you take it out of the context of East and West, money, and politics, there is something sexual about an oil drill existing the middle of the sand,” says Hod. “Yet in reality, its beauty is also completely dissolved in this world of violence.”
Hod’s The Back Room series, meanwhile, showcases his new coating process, which transforms matte canvases into reflective surfaces. His inspiration: the aesthetic similarities between CBGB bathroom stalls and Nazi gas chambers. “I like to bring my materials from the places that other people don’t like to look, because I find so much beauty in them,” he says. “These painting are not about the clubs or the Holocaust, they are about the universal nature of loneliness.”
Nir Hod’s Once Everything Was Much Better Even The Future opens TONIGHT at Paul Kasmin Gallery, 515 West 27th Street, New York.
For more photos, view the article on wmagazine.com.

Above: Nir Hod at work. Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Nir Hod in W Magazine

Behind the Mirror
Artist Nir Hod’s new exhibition examines the beauty in loneliness
by Kat Herriman

After working for 15 years out of his Meatpacking District studio, Israeli-born artist Nir Hod is as much a New Yorker as he is a transplant—and his new exhibition “Once Everything Was Much Better Even the Future” at Paul Kasmin Gallery is a collision of the paradoxical influences that have shaped his city experience. A converging swell of nightclub narcissism, dark history, salacious violence, and materialistic glamour, the work explores the perverse beauty in our ugliest desires. With not a portrait in sight, the show is a first for Hod, who is best known for his sickly humorous Genius series, which features Van-Dyke-inspired paintings of insidious toddlers.

One of the show’s most compelling elements is a triptych of flaming orchids entitled I Want Always to be Remembered in Your Heart. “I became obsessed with the challenge of painting realistic flames after looking at the surreal realism of Gerhard Richter’s work,” says Hod. “I wanted the flames to look almost like a ghost encompassing the flower.” Another notable piece is his pumpjack snowglobe, a larger-than-life sculpture in the form of the iconic souvenir, which is filled with crude oil rather than white flakes in water. “When you take it out of the context of East and West, money, and politics, there is something sexual about an oil drill existing the middle of the sand,” says Hod. “Yet in reality, its beauty is also completely dissolved in this world of violence.”

Hod’s The Back Room series, meanwhile, showcases his new coating process, which transforms matte canvases into reflective surfaces. His inspiration: the aesthetic similarities between CBGB bathroom stalls and Nazi gas chambers. “I like to bring my materials from the places that other people don’t like to look, because I find so much beauty in them,” he says. “These painting are not about the clubs or the Holocaust, they are about the universal nature of loneliness.”

Nir Hod’s Once Everything Was Much Better Even The Future opens TONIGHT at Paul Kasmin Gallery, 515 West 27th Street, New York.

For more photos, view the article on wmagazine.com.

Above: Nir Hod at work. Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery.

Installation images by Christopher Burke
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Installation images by Christopher Burke
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For his most recent body of work, HIGH SPEED DRAWINGS, James Nares utilized a spinning steel drum, powered by a motor. As the drum, with paper fastened to it, rotates, the artist draws lines of ink using paintbrushes specifically made for these drawings. As a result of the spinning drum and the artist’s precise movements, each band takes its own form. Nares artworks showcase his exploration on the subject of movement; some drawings he creates with one steady line, others from a continuously repeating stroke, but all manifest a carful choreography of spontaneity and control.

James Nares: HIGH SPEED DRAWINGSopens this evening from 6-8pm at 293 Tenth Avenue. 

Installation images by Christopher Burke

In the studio with Nir Hod. 
Be sure you don’t miss the opening of “Once Everything Was Much Better Even The Future,” this Thursday at 515 West 27 Street from 6-8pm.
Click through for our exhibitions page to get all the details.

In the studio with Nir Hod.

Be sure you don’t miss the opening of “Once Everything Was Much Better Even The Future,” this Thursday at 515 West 27 Street from 6-8pm.

Click through for our exhibitions page to get all the details.

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James Nares
by Deborah Wilk for Modern Painters

The writer Glenn O’Brien once dubbed Nares the last action painter. While the London-born New Yorker certainly understands the compliment, he bristles a bit at the term itself. “Gesture is a loaded word for a painter,” he says. “Most people associate it with a wild, uncontrolled quality, and my movements are just the opposite.”

Indeed, the work hanging on the studio wall behind him—a single stroke of monochromatic fluidity replete with perfectly placed spatters—looks as if it were digitally perfected, then ink-jet printed. Remarkably, Nares doesn’t take offense at the idea that his hand is nearly undetectable. “I make paintings that reference the temporal aspects of photography,” he explains. “They’re made in the same time frame it takes to click the shutter.” The process entails an isolated maneuver of brush on canvas, immediately assessed and whisked away by squeegee if deemed unacceptable. Smaller works are created with the six-foot-plus artist leaning over a table in his 3,500-square-foot Chelsea loft. Larger pieces entail his hanging from a custom harness, allowing him to float over teh painted surface. These works are, he says, “an imprint of my body.”

Before fine-tuning his painting, Nares was a stalwart of lower Manhattan’s 1970s and ’80s scene, making films and performances. The decision to distill down to a single medium has resulted in extraordinarily tight compositions in what is now broadening back into a multimedia practice. The artist’s 2011 film Street—a richly detailed, slow-motion exploration of New York City—was acquired by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. earlier this year. Nares will show a series of Speed Paintings at Paul Kasmin Gallery this month. “With the success of the films, I feel freed to reach out again after restricting myself to painting,” says Nares. “After stripping everything away, I was left with the big brush.”

Be sure to join us at 293 10th Avenue this Wednesday, September 10 for James Nares: HIGH SPEED DRAWINGS

James Nares in his studio
Photo by Kristine Larsen, courtesy of Modern Painters

James Nares, Untitled, 2014 (detail)
Untitled, 2014, ink on paper
60 x 95 inches (152.4 x 241.3 cm)
Image courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Galley

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Bloodflames Revisited will close this Friday, August 15th. Stop by both gallery locations to experience curator Phong Bui’s contemporary reinterpretation of the groundbreaking exhibition Bloodflames which took place at New York’s Hugo Gallery in 1947. 

Photo (left): © 2014 Austrian Frederick and Lillian Kiesler Private Foundation, Vienna.

Photo (right): Josh Nefsky

#BloodflamesRevisited #PaulKasminGallery 

Paul Laster from Time Out New York gives “Bloodflames Revisited” four stars! A total of 25 contemporary artists will be showing at both locations until Friday, August 15th! 
Photo by Josh Nefsky. 

Paul Laster from Time Out New York gives “Bloodflames Revisited” four stars! A total of 25 contemporary artists will be showing at both locations until Friday, August 15th! 

Photo by Josh Nefsky. 

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